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Graduate Certificate in Energy Print E-mail

Graduate Certificate in Energy
Rutgers University, Graduate School, New Brunswick

   

  The Program

The Graduate Certificate in Energy is designed to giving Rutgers students a strong background in the timely topic of energy. The Graduate Certificate in Energy takes advantage of the several energy-related courses offered at Rutgers, as well as ongoing research at our university involving all aspects of energy. The Graduate Certificate in Energy will build on the diversity, magnitude, and variety of Rutgers resources in science, engineering and public policy by enabling graduate students to cross over to courses outside their graduate program and enrich their background in energy. Students receiving this certificate will have received a broad exposure to the topics and challenges in energy and they will have stronger qualifications to pursue a career in industry, government and academia upon graduation, as well as become leaders in innovation. Currently, Rutgers is unique in New Jersey offering a Graduate Certificate in Energy.

Participating graduate programs currently include but are not limited to:

Bioenvironmental Engineering

Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

Business School

Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Environmental Science

Materials Science and Engineering

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Physics and Astronomy

 

Eligibility and Application to the Program

Any graduate student in a natural sciences or engineering graduate program is eligible to apply for the Graduate Certificate in Energy. Once accepted, the graduate student must take three courses from the list of courses below. The certificate will be issued after the student completes all degree requirements for their programs of study. The student must submit an application to the Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) office, listing the courses the student intends to take for the Certificate in Energy. Students are encouraged to select their courses from a broad range of topics related to energy, in order to have balance and diversity in their education.
The courses that the certificate student takes must be outside the student's graduate program. It is the student's responsibility to make sure that they will get graduate credit for the courses they take from their graduate programs and that they have satisfied the prerequisites of the certificate courses they wish to take.
A student can select one of the certificate courses as an independent study. The topic and the faculty member supervising the independent study have to be approved by the REI office.

Download Application Form in PDF Format

 

Courses that a Student Can Take in Order to Receive the Graduate Certificate In Energy

New courses are continually being added and the list is not limited to those listed.  The course list is periodically revised to reflect new offersings at Rutgers.

Energy Graduate Courses

16:335:501,502 Integrated Energy Challenges and Opportunities I,II (2,2) Challenges and opportunities related to society's demand for energy and the resulting environmental impact, from the perspective of physical, biological, and social sciences and  engineering. Prerequisite: IGERT fellowship or permission of instructor. Goldman, Felder, Struwe.

16:335:504 (S) Algal Genomics for Environmental and Biofuels Research (2) Diversity of photosynthetic microbial (algal) forms; phylogenetic interrelationships; emerging genomics tools; integration of the above for study and development of algal sources of oil and starch for sustainable biofuels. Bhattacharya et al.  Recommended: background in fundamental genetics and bioinformatics.

Biology

26:120:522 (NW) Resource Sustainability

Business School

22:799:607 (NW) Supply Chain Management Strategies

22:799:608 (NW) Procurement Management and Global Sourcing

Business and Science

137:555  Concepts in Corporate Sustainability

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

155:453  Chemical Environmental Engineering

155:511  Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

155:512  Advanced Chemical Engineering Molecular Thermodynamics

155:514  Kinetics, Catalysis, and Reactor Design

155:518  Process Systems Engineering

155:531  Biochemical Engineering

155:533  Bioseparations

Chemistry and Chemical Biology

160:425  Chemical Thermodynamics

160:521  Atomic and Molecular Structure

160:525  Chemical Thermodynamics

160:541  Special Problems Chemistry/Materials: Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

160:575  Organometallic Chemistry

160:579  Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry - Integrated Energy Challenges and Opportunities

Civil and Environmental Engineering

180:429  Water and Wastewater Engineering

180:564  Unit Processing in Environmental Engineering

180:565  Biogeochemical Engineering

180:568  Thermal Effects on Receiving Waters

Ecology and Evolution

215:650 Fundamentals of Ecosystem Ecology

Electrical and Computer Engineering

332:402/585  Sustainable Energy: choosing among options

332:411 Electrical Energy Conversion

332:581  Introduction to Solid State Electronics

332:583  Semiconductor Devices I

332:594  Solar Cells

Environmental and Business Economics

373:363  Environmental Economics

Environmental Sciences

375:322  Energy Technology and its Environmental Impact

375:510  Environmental Microbiology

375:517  Applications of Aquatic Chemistry

375:522  Environmental Organic Chemistry

375:523  Environmental Fate and Transport

375:534  Environmental Sustainability

375:563  Geomicrobiology

Materials Science and Engineering

635:413 Solar Technology Venture Analysis

635:503 Theory of Solid State Materials

635:511  Thermal Analysis of Materials

635:527  Thermodynamics of Materials Systems

635:532 (S) Kinetics of Materials Systems

635:566  Electron Microscopy

635:604 Special Problems Chemistry/Materials: Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

635:604:02:78052  Special Topics Materials: Devices for Energy Storage, Harvesting and Conversion

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

650:461  Internal Combustion Engines

650:462  Power Plants

650:474  Alternative Energy Systems

650:541 Microsystems and Nanosystems

650:570  Conduction Heat Transfer

650:574  Advanced Thermodynamics

650:578  Convection Heat Transfer

650:670  Combustion

650:674  Radiation Hear Transfer

Microbiology

680:491  Microbial Ecology and Diversity

Ecology and Evolution

704:466  Ecosystem Modeling and Management

Physics

750:451  Physical Oceanography

750:611  Statistical Mechanics

750:612  High Energy Astrophysics

Planning and Public Policy

970:571  Industrial Ecology

970:672  Energy and Policy and Planning

 

For More Information on the Graduate Certificate in Energy

Rutgers Energy Institute
Paul Falkowski, Director, Graduate Certificate Program
Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
71 Dudley Road
New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901-8521

Contact:
Program Coordinator
Beatrice Birrer
848-932-3436
email: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it  

 

Admission to Rutgers University

Applicants interested in pursuing graduate work at Rutgers, either the master's or doctoral level, must apply to one of the participating graduate academic degree programs. A curriculum plan will be developed with an appropriate faculty adviser in that program. For application forms and additional information about Rutgers admission to the participating degree programs (including deadlines, GRE scores, and other requirements, which vary by program), contact:

Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions,
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey,
18 Bishop Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8530
http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu

 
Energy Policy Courses Print E-mail

At Rutgers, courses related to energy policy are offered within both the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences courses are listed here, the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy are listed below:

970:672 ENERGY AND POLICY AND PLANNING SEMINAR (Graduate) Energy policy is gaining increasing recognition as a critical component of state and national public policy. Issues surrounding the reliability and security of energy supplies directly effect national domestic and foreign policy, as well as state level environmental, economic development and land use concerns. Moreover, the policies, strategies, and programs adopted by both the public and private sectors will directly impact upon our lives as professionals, members of a community, and our families. This graduate seminar course will examine energy policy and planning through a timely, critical and practical approach designed to give students an insight into the factors that shape energy policy.

970:571 GREEN BUILDINGS (Graduate Seminar) This graduate seminar focuses on the green building phenomenon. It provides a multidisciplinary, rigorous, and practical introduction to green building. Students will learn about the following:

  • Socio-economic context: post-materialism, ecological modernization, socially responsible business
  • Nested policy and planning framework: protecting global commons, correcting national market failures, regional smart growth, traditional neighborhood design, green technology promotion
  • Finance & markets: real estate finance, market structure, green premiums
  • Design: architecture 101, engineering 101, integrated design process
  • LEED and other design guides: key systems and design choices
  • Case studies and best practices
  • Evaluating building performance
  • LEED AP exam primer
Green Buildings is also cross listed as "Special Topics in Industrial Ecology"
 
Energy Engineering Courses Print E-mail

At Rutgers, courses related to engineering aspects of energy are offered within the School of Engineering and are listed below:

14:125:210 BIOMEDICAL DEVICES AND SYSTEMS Time and frequency domain analysis of electrical networks; hydrodynamic, mechanical, and thermal analogs; basic medical electronics, and energy conversion systems. Design of biological sensors. Prerequisites: 01:640:251, 01:750:227 and 229, 14:125: 201. Corequisite: 14:125:211.

14:125:308 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS (3) Relationship between applied and resultant forces and stresses acting on the musculoskeletal system. Basic concepts of vectors, internal and external forces, functional anatomy, trusses and equilibria of spatial force systems, moments, and work and energy concepts. Stress and strain tensors, principal forces, viscoelasticity, and failure analysis from classical mechanics. Prerequisites: 01:640:244, 01:750:228 and 230, 14:125: 303 and 305, 14:440:221.

11:127:424 BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNIT PROCESSES LABORATORY II (1) Demonstration of biochemical operations used in the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater, including biodegrad- ability and biodegradation kinetics, energy balance in a biological reactor, respirometry, activated sludge, anaerobic toxicity, and aerobic digestion. Prerequisite: 01:160:171 or equivalent. Corequisite: 11:127:414. 11:127:490 STRUCTURAL DESIGN AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL (3) Functional requirements and design aspects for controlled environment plant production systems, including structures, energy flows and balances, and environmental control equipment. Prerequisites: 14:180:215, 243.

11:127:492 ENERGY CONVERSION FOR BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (3) Principles of energy conversion techniques and their application to various biomechanical systems, including solar energy systems, compostation, methane and alcohol production, and the internal combustion engine. Prerequisite: 14:650:351.

14:150:405 SOLAR CELL DESIGN AND PROCESSING This class will be heavily design oriented and will be aimed to satisfy 2 units of Engineering Design according to ABET specifications.

14:155:201 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ANALYSIS I (3) Introductory course. Mass and energy balances, recycle and bypass calculations. First Law of Thermodynamics and application to closed and open systems. Formulation of simple chemical equilibria. Analysis and solution of mass and energy balance problems for complex processes. Prerequisites: 01:160:160, 171; 01:640:152.

14:155:304 TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING II (3) Energy and mass transfer in chemical engineering processes, with computer applications. Steady-state and unsteady-state heat conduction and molecular diffusion. Energy and mass transfer in fluids undergoing flow, phase change, and/or chemical reaction. Radiant heat transfer. Heat exchangers and mass transfer equipment. Prerequisites: 14:155:303, 01:640:421 or equivalent.

14:180:382 HYDRAULIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (3) Basic concepts of viscous flows; conservation laws (mass, momentum, and energy); pipe flows and open-channel flows; water distribution systems; hydraulic modeling (stream and marine pollution); air, stream, and marine pollution problems. Computer applications. Prerequisite: 14:180:387.

14:180:387 FLUID MECHANICS (3) Fluid properties, statics and kinematics; concepts of system and control volume; mass, momentum, and energy conservation principles; laminar and turbulent flows in conduits and channels; boundary layer theory; drag and lift; ideal fluid flow. Prerequisites: 14:440:222, 01:640:244.

14:180:389FLUID MECHANICS LABORATORY (1) Experimental applications and demonstrations; measurement of fluid properties; applications of mass, energy, and momentum principles; energy losses; forces on immersed bodies; flow measurement devices. Corequisite: 14:180:387.

14:332:411 ELECTRICAL ENERGY CONVERSION (3) Principles of converting electrical energy into mechanical energy, and the reverse, via electromagnetic field interaction. Identification of different machines and their applications, understand machine-operating principles, and analyze key characteristics. Understanding of magnetic and thermal constraints. Prerequisites: 14:332:221-222.

14:440:222 ENGINEERING MECHANICS: DYNAMICS (3) Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; rectangular, path, and polar descriptions. Relative motion. Kinetics of particles, particle systems, and rigid bodies; equations of motion, principles of work and energy, linear and angular impulse and momentum. Impact. Prerequisites: 14:440:221, 01:640:152, 01:750:124. Corequisite: 01:640:251.

14:650:312 FLUID MECHANICS (3) Control volume concepts of mass, momentum, and energy transport. Hydrostatics, Euler's equations, potential flow, Navier Stokes equations, turbulence, and boundary layer theory. Prerequisite: 01:640:244.

14:650:342 DESIGN OF MECHANICAL COMPONENTS (3) Design philosophy; stress and deflection analysis; energy methods; theories of failure; fatigue; bearings; design of such mechanical elements as springs, weldments, and gears. Prerequisites: 14:650:291, 14:440:222.

14:650:474 SOLAR THERMAL ENERGY COLLECTION AND STORAGE (3) Introduction to the design and theory of systems that employ solar thermal energy as a replacement for fossil fuel energy used in buildings and homes. Design project. Open only to senior engineering or physical sciences majors.

14:650:485 TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (3) One or two topics of current importance and interest studied intensively. Topic examples: acoustics, combustion, energy conversion, refrigeration, urban engineering, and propulsion. Open only to senior mechanical engineering majors.

 
Energy Science Courses Print E-mail

At Rutgers, courses related to the science of energy are offered within the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences and are listed below:

11:015:250-299 TOPICS IN AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (1 EACH) A variety of 1-credit courses, some of which are offered on a Pass/No Credit basis, covering a wide range of skills and issues relevant to contemporary problems in agriculture and the environment. Topics change from term-to-term and year-to-year. Consult the Schedule of Classes for current offerings. Recurrent energy-related topics include the following:

  • History of New Jersey Agriculture: An internship at the New Jersey Museum of Agriculture (located at the edge of the Cook College campus).
  • Solar Energy: Fundamentals of solar energy with focus on useful applications.
  • Thoreau and Modern Environmentalism: A study of Thoreau's work and its influence on contemporary environmental writing and ideologies.
11:117:462 DESIGN OF SOLID WASTE TREATMENT SYSTEMS Analysis and design of integrated solid waste management systems, including waste minimization, quanitity estimates, waste characteristics, collection, composting, materials recovery, recycling, incineration, and landfilling. See also 11:375:307

11:127:424 BIOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNIT PROCESSES LABORATORY II (1) Demonstration of biochemical operations used in the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater, including biodegradability and biodegradation kinetics, energy balance in a biological reactor, respirometry, activated sludge, anaerobic toxicity, and aerobic digestion. Prerequisite: 01:160:171 or equivalent. Corequisite: 11:127:414.

11:127:490 STRUCTURAL DESIGN AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL (3) Functional requirements and design aspects for controlled environment plant production systems including structures, energy flows and balances, and environmental control equipment. Prerequisites: 14:180:215, 243.

11:127:492 ENERGY CONVERSION FOR BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS (3) Principles of energy conversion techniques and their application to various biomechanical systems, including solar energy systems, compostation, methane and alcohol production, and the internal combustion engine. Prerequisite: 14:650:351.

11:374:175 ENERGY AND SOCIETY (3) Main sources, transfers, and losses of energy in the biosphere; how they relate to human resources and enter the immediate environments of humans and other organisms.

11:374:279 POLITICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES (3) The content and process of policy making concerning air and water quality, toxic wastes, energy, and other environmental issues.

11:375:203 PHYSICAL PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (3) Physical properties of water, air, and soils; energy and water in the earth system; kinetic and potential energy; and soil/plant/ atmosphere relations. Pre- or corequisites: 01:750:194 or 202 or 204.

11:375:303 NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3) Formulation and solution of environmental science problems by applying analytical and numerical techniques. Principles of data analysis. Generation and solution of mass and energy balances. (Formerly 11:375:437)

11:375:307 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT Analysis and design of integrated solid waste management systems, including waste minimization, quanitity estimates, waste characteristics, collection, composting, materials recovery, recycling, incineration, and landfilling. See also 11:117:462  

11:375:322 ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT (3) Environmental consequences of energy utilization (transportation, space heating, etc.) and the production of power; the indirect effects of the isolation, purification, and transportation of primary energy resources.

11:375:453 SOIL ECOLOGY (3) Soil microbial contribution to ecosystem function, microbial diversity, nutrient cycling, soil enzymes, fate of soil amend- ments, soil flora and fauna, energy cycling, quantification of soil biological processes. Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102.

11:550:340 PLANTING DESIGN (4) Plants as design elements affecting function, comfort, energy efficiency, and aesthetic quality. Selection of plants to serve functional and aesthetic purposes. Specification for planting design. Lec. 2 hrs., studio 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 11:550:231, 232, or permission of instructor.

11:628:120 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3) Plate tectonics, properties and motion of the ocean (waves, tides, currents), ocean resources (food, energy, minerals), and related marine environmental issues changing our understanding of the planet and its impact on our lives.

11:670:323 THERMODYNAMICS OF ATMOSPHERE (3) Thermodynamics of the atmosphere, energy conservation, ideal gas law, water and its transformations, moist air, aerosols, hydrostatic stability and convection, vertical motion, cloud formation, and precipitation. Prerequisites: 01:640:152 and 251; 01:750:194 or equivalent.

11:680:491 MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND DIVERSITY (3) Ecological determinants; characteristics of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; nature and activity of microbial populations; biogeochemical cycles and energy flow; microbial interactions and community structures. Two 80-min. lecs., one 180-min. lab. Prerequisite: 01: 447:390 or 11:680:390.

11:704:466 ECOSYSTEM MODELING AND MANAGEMENT (4) Basic quantitative/computer skills for modeling major ecosystem processes: carbon, water, energy balance. Spatial modeling using remote sensing/GIS for management and global change. Two 80-min. lecs., one 3-hr. lab. Prerequisites: A term of calculus, 11:704:351, or permission.

11:776:410 PLANTS FOR BIOENERGY (3) Bioenergy introduction/discussion; Crops/Biomass Sources: Sugar/Starch, Grass/Fiber, Oil, Residue/Waste, Improvement; Harvest, Storage, Handling, Processing, Quality Analyses; Conversion Technologies; Use in NJ. Two 80-min. lecs. Prerequisites: General Biology 01:119:101 and 01:119:102.  

01:556:143 ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE New Rutgers Energy Institute Undergraduate Course   The goal of this course is to introduce non-science majors to science and the scientific method within the context of one of the most critical long-term challenges facing the world today: society’s need for energy and the resulting impact on climate and the environment. Energy-related economics and policy options will be introduced. Climate, physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, economics and policy will be surveyed, as they relate to energy and sustainability from a global perspective. The course will be composed of individual modules (3-5 lectures), each taught by an expert in his or her field.

 
Energy Courses Print E-mail

rei10.jpgRutgers University offers courses that explore the science, engineering, and policy of energy. Science courses are offered within the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, engineering courses are offered within the School of Engineering, and policy courses are offered within the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. A list of course offered at all three schools can be downloaded here (pdf)). The links below provide information on energy-related courses available at Rutgers.

 

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