News and Announcements

energy contest winners small2

 (Left to Right: Maya Robles, Emily Cheng, Stephen Petrides, Zijun Xu, Swati Modhwadia, Evan Lutz,  Emily Nanneman)

The Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) annually challenges Rutgers undergraduates to develop implementable plans for reducing energy consumption on campus.

 

The three winning entries were awarded prizes at the 2018 REI Annual Symposium.

View Presentation Video by REI Associate Director Kevin Lyons

1st Place for $2,500:  The Collegiate Carbon Exchange

Emily Cheng and Maya Robles

Cheng Major: Environmental Policy, Institutions and Behavior  Minor:  Economics

Robles Major: Environmental Policy, Institutions and Behavior  Minor:  Spanish and Cultural Anthropology

Abstract:  Our solution is a cap and trade program among the Big 10 universities that will accelerate the process to achieve carbon neutrality. The program, called the College Carbon Exchange (CCX) will provide the mechanism for universities to invest in clean energy and energy efficient operations and engage students to improve their energy behavior. CCX will incentivize universities to take strong action on an issue where cost has usually been a barrier. Schools part of the trading scheme will include the University of Illinois Urbana- Champaign, University of Iowa, Indiana University, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, Michigan State, University of Minnesota, University of Nebraska, Ohio State University, Penn State University, Purdue University, University of Wisconsin, and Rutgers University. CCX will enable these large, public universities to be climate leaders.

  • Final Proposal
  • Video
  • Poster

 

2nd Place for $1,500: Savings Found From Reforming Laundry Room Habits and Installing New Clothes Dryers at Rutgers New Brunswick

Evan Lutz, Emily Sukenik, Zijun Xu, Stephen Petrides, Swati Modhwadia

Students for Environmental & Energy Development (SEED)

Abstract: Students for Environmental & Energy Development (SEED) found that by modifying student habits in the laundry room, the university could save $88,500 per year and by installing all new dryers, could save $81,200 a year. Altogether, this proposal indicates $150,300 in possible savings per year if students were to modify their habits and use new dryers. If money saved from implementing new student habits went into purchasing new dryers, the university could be outfitted with new dryers after six years. 

  • Final Proposal
  • Video
  • Poster

 

3rd Place for $1,000:  Lighting the Way to Savings with LED's

Kyra Frank and Emily Nanneman

Frank Major: Environmental Policy, Institutions and Behavior and Philosophy

Nanneman Major: Environmental Policy, Institutions and Behavior

Abstract:  With the majority of traditional style residence halls at Rutgers lit by inefficient fluorescent light fixtures, dorm lighting uses large amounts of energy and costs a substantial amount of money each year. To cut back on Rutgers’ energy use, we propose replacing fluorescent lighting with LEDs controlled by occupancy sensors. LED bulbs are at least 75% more efficient than fluorescent bulbs and last 25 times longer. While the initial costs of LEDs are greater, the potential savings make the switch a sound investment.

  • Final Proposal
  • Video
  • Poster

 

In an amazing achievement akin to adding solar panels to your body, a northeast sea slug sucks raw materials from algae to provide its lifetime supply of solar-powered energy, according to a study by Rutgers University–New Brunswick and other scientists.

“It’s a remarkable feat because it’s highly unusual for an animal to behave like a plant and survive solely on photosynthesis,” said Debashish Bhattacharya, senior author of the study and distinguished professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at Rutgers–New Brunswick. “The broader implication is in the field of artificial photosynthesis. That is, if we can figure out how the slug maintains stolen, isolated plastids to fix carbon without the plant nucleus, then maybe we can also harness isolated plastids for eternity as green machines to create bioproducts or energy. The existing paradigm is that to make green energy, we need the plant or alga to run the photosynthetic organelle, but the slug shows us that this does not have to be the case.” Read more

ARPA-E has joined NASA to launch a new NASA iTech challenge, a competition inviting the nation’s top entrepreneurs and researchers to showcase their ideas for transformative energy concepts. 

The challenge seeks to identify innovative technologies that can improve energy generation, storage and distribution to the benefit of both space exploration and life on Earth. ARPA-E will support the competition and judging process by providing subject matter expertise across a wide variety of energy technologies.

Inventors and entrepreneurs can submit a five-page white paper on their concept on the NASA iTech websitethrough April 29, 2018. A panel of subject matter experts from NASA and ARPA-E will review ideas submitted and select the top 10 finalists based on their relevance and potential impact.

The top 10 finalists will be invited to present their ideas to NASA and ARPA-E technologists, other energy and space experts and potential investors at the 2018 NASA iTech Cycle II Forum this June in New York City.

A few examples of technology sub-themes that NASA believes have the potential to improve future space power systems include, but are not limited to:

  • FUEL CELLS AND REGENERATIVE FUEL CELLS

  • HIGH-ENERGY DENSITY BATTERIES AND SUPERCAPACITORS

  • SOLAR POWER SYSTEMS

  • SMALL FISSION POWER SYSTEMS

  • INNOVATIVE POWER MANAGEMENT AND DISTRIBUTION (INCLUDING SMART GRIDS AND WIRELESS POWER TRANSFER)

  • X-FACTOR ENERGY

 

The  Center on Global Energy Policy 
Women in Energy 
Internship Funding Application 
Stipends are awarded to outstanding female students who have secured summer internship positions with companies or organizations in energy related sectors. Opportunity is open to non-Columbia female graduate students. 

Internship Funding Eligibility

  • The internship must be relevant to the energy or climate field.
  • The internship offer must be secured at the time of application.
  • "Independent study" internships or academic courses abroad are not eligible.
  • Internship is unpaid.
  • Positions must be a minimum of 6 weeks in duration.
  • Internships in student's family-owned organizations are not eligible.
  • Must be a current female grad student as of Summer 2018. 

All student and internship eligibility requirements must be met in order to qualify for consideration. 

 
Application requirements:

  • 1 page memo – It must include student’s name, UNI & Columbia ID number (for Columbia students), telephone number, school email address, year of graduation, reason for interning in your chosen organization/company, and reason for applying for the Internship Stipend. This is needs-based funding; students are required to demonstrate a need for the stipend in the memo.
    • For CU students: Stipends will be mailed to the address in the Columbia Student Services system.
  • Curriculum vitae/résumé – Students must include a current CV/ résumé and information on academic standing. 
  • Recommendation letter: one confidential letter of recommendation (sent under separate cover by the recommender).
  • Internship verification: Letter from a representative of the organization with which you plan to perform your internship.
    • Must include:
      • Representative’s title and contact information
      • Job description: Detailed description of tasks and responsibilities to be performed
      • Internship start and end date
      • Specify that the internship is unpaid

By accepting the funding, you are agreeing to the following commitments:

  1. Writing or speaking about your experience which may involve:
    1. Writing a short article or blog post describing your experience for the Center on Global Energy Policy Women in Energy program website
  2. Summary report sent within six weeks of the completion of the internship to be featured in the Women in Energy website and
  3. Participating in activities promoting the Women in Energy program, including but not limited to: speaking at an informational session for the Center on Global Energy Policy, or relevant student clubs’ events and
  4. Completing an end-of-semester stipend funding survey/debrief and
  5. Producing a thank you note to the donors for the Women in Energy program 

Deadline: 
Application materials should be emailed in a single packet (except for the confidential recommendation letter, which should be emailed directly by the recommender).Incomplete applications will not be considered. 
THIS APPLICATION IS DUE May 1, 2018.
 
To submit application packet or if you have any questions,
please contact Jully Meriño Carela at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 

Rutgers EcoComplex offers summer internships: 

Explore. Learn. Play. Get ready to celebrate Rutgers Day  on  April 28, 2018. All are welcome and admission is free!

 

The Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) will be on the New Brunswick Busch Campus. 

Come visit us and learn more about what Rutgers is doing to advance Energy Solutions.

Learn about Rutgers expertise in science, engineering, economics, and policy for energy solutions. Meet our amazing students and play Energy Jeopardy for prizes. 

The Rutgers Energy Institute will be in the Engineering Area , 15, BEA - 131.

The Rutgers workshop “The Bioeconomy: Technological and Policy Path Forward” provided a context for a broad discussion regarding the development of the bio-economy. The workshop examined the interrelationship of biomass to energy production and biomass-based chemicals. It advance knowledge about policy effectiveness and identified gaps that we need to overcome so to achieve a viable and sustainable multi-function bio-economy.

Key conclusions and insights derived in the workshop “The Bioeconomy: Technological and Policy Path Forward” are summarized in the following USDA Office of the Chief Economist six factsheets:

FACTSHEET: Alternative Aviation Fuel: Preethy Thangaraj, Gal Hochman

FACTSHEET: Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage: P. Thangaraj, S. Okoye , B. Gordon, D. Zilberman, G. Hochman

FACTSHEET: Biofuels: Preethy Thangaraj, David Zilberman, Gal Hochman

FACTSHEET: Bioproducts: P. Thangaraj, B. Gordon, D. Zilberman, Dustin Wang, G. Hochman

FACTSHEET: Duckweed as Biomass: Preethy Thangaraj, Eric Lam, Gal Hochman

FACTSHEET: Manipulation to Improve Sustainability of Biomass Production: Preethy Thangaraj, Robin Brumfield, Gal Hochman

 

The authors thank NIFA award # 2016-670023-24751, the USDA Office of Energy Policy and New Uses by cooperative agreement #58-0111-15-007, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, and the Rutgers Energy Institute for financial support.

Rutgers University has set a new record by having 2 teams from one university as titleholders of the Hult Prize Regionals Competition. Today, the Hult Prize is the world’s biggest engine for the launch of for-good, for-profit startups emerging from universities with over 2,500 staff and volunteers around the world. In nearly a decade, the movement has deployed more than $50M of capital into the sector and mobilized more than one million young people to rethink the future of business as it continues to breed disruptive innovation on college and university campuses across 100 plus countries. The Hult Prize Foundation been called the “Nobel Prize for Students” and has been featured in a TIME Magazine Cover Story highlighting the “Top 5 Ideas Changing the World.” This year’s challenge focuses on harnessing the power of energy to transform the lives of 10 million people by 2025. ( www.hultprize.org )

Hult Prize at Rutgers held a pitch competition in December 2017 and the first-place winner, Sulis, continued to the Boston Regional competition in March 2018. There, Sulis competed against 45 universities from around the world and won first place, beating teams from Yale University, Brown University, Harvard University, University of Michigan, New York University, Duke University, the University of Pennsylvania, and others. LivingWaters applied through the online application of the competition and made it to the Shanghai regional finals, there beating out over 50 of the top Asian universities to advance to the summer accelerator. Read more...

 

Women in Energy & Environmental Leadership

An event to foster leadership and careers of women in the industry

22-Mar-2018, 7:30-9:00AM
Join for a FREE breakfast at GLOBALCON presenting case studies of successful women businesses owners and national program leaders as they discuss the unique barriers, opportunities and challenges they encounter in their work. The meeting is presented by the Council on Women in Energy and Environmental Leadership (CWEEL). CWEEL seeks to develop a prominent voice for women in the industry, and to contribute to the advancement of women in leadership positions throughout the industry.

Learn more about CWEEL -https://cweel.wordpress.com/

Register - https://portal.aeecenter.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageID=4228

Join the Rutgers Energy Institute for a Women in Energy (WIE) networking and mentoring event. Dean Jacquelyn Litt, of Douglass Residential College and Douglass Campus, will discuss initiatives and programs at Douglass College and how YOU can participate.

Education and Career Paths in Energy

The focus is on female leadership in the energy and STEM sector, with participants sharing their experiences, career paths, and advise. Attendees will be provided the opportunity to network and/or mentor with faculty, alumni, government and corporate leaders, post-doctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students, both during the speed networking and reception portion of the evening.

Rutgers University Busch Student Center - The Cove, 604 Bartholomew Road  Piscataway, NJ 08854

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 6:00pm to 8:00pm ET

Event is Free but

Registration will be required - Click Here

 

Parking: Visitors may park in Lots 51, 59, 60B & 67 without permits. Special event parking is only for visitors to the University and does not include free metered parking. Faculty, Staff, and Students must park only in lots they are authorized to park in.

 Speakers

Jacquelyn Litt

Jacquelyn Litt:

Jacquelyn Litt is Dean of Douglass Residential College and the Douglass Campus, and is Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. She has expertise in women in STEM, was a P.I. and consultant for the ADVANCE program to advance women in STEM at the National Science Foundation and a grant reviewer for innovative STEM pedagogy projects at the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Litt received the “Leaders in Faculty Diversity” in 2016 from The Committee to Advance Our Common Purpose at Rutgers University in recognition of her outstanding leadership in building new opportunities for students at Douglass to share diverse perspectives in a safe and inclusive environment. Litt was honored in 2016 with a Joint Legislative Resolution from the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, honoring her leadership of Douglass Residential College and her research on women’s issues that have made a positive impact on the lives of women and children.

M. Silvina Tomassone: Tomassone is an Associate Professor in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering who is recently working on catalysis at the nexus of food energy and water, nanoscience, nanotechnology, energy storage,and grapheme oxide anodes for lithium ion batteries. Tomassone is the recipient of several teaching awards including Professor of the Year Award in Engineering (2016) and Teaching Excellence Awards in 2006, 2010, 2011 and 2013.

About the Women in Energy Program: The Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) is sponsoring a new multidisciplinary networking group called Women in Energy (WIE).  WIE is aimed at increasing the presence of women in the energy sector, and over the mid to long term, the presence of women in senior and management roles across the energy space - energy and environmental research and policy. The WIE seeks to empower women to realize their full potential, building a thriving community of professional women - we hope you can join us at our events.

If you are interested in participating as a mentor or have any questions please contact Johanna Bernstein at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Beatrice Birrer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

FOOD, ENERGY & WATER GRANT WORKSHOP

March 2nd

10:45am-12:30pm

Douglass Student Center, Douglass Lounge *

* note recent change in location (event no longer at CSC)

(Lunch served)

Interested in participating in an interdisciplinary research proposal team on innovations in food, energy and water?  Have relevant work you’d like to build on or extend?  Please join us! 

The National Science Foundation has indicated it will likely release a RFP for Innovation in Food Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS) in the spring of 2018.  Sponsored by the Rutgers Energy Institute (REI), this workshop is meant to help Rutgers researchers network and form interdisciplinary teams around FEWs research questions of interest.

RSVP is recommended to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 2/28

AGENDA

10:45-10:55am             Introduction to FEWS and past RFP Requirements  (Rachael Shwom, Associate Director REI)

10:55-11:50am             3-5 minute introductions by workshop participants on their FEWs related research and questions of interest.

                                     Identification of overlapping interests.

11:50am-12:30pm        Roundtable lunch to sit with researchers with similar interests in research questions

Please contact Rachael Shwom (REI Associate Director) with any questions, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Paul Falkowski 5 portrait 580x870The 2018 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement – often described as the ‘Nobel Prize for the Environment’ – has been awarded to Paul Falkowski and James J. McCarthy, for their decades of leadership in understanding – and communicating – the impacts of climate change. Paul Falkowski is a Rutgers distinguished professor in the departments of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Marine and Coastal Sciences as well as director of the Rutgers Energy Institute. James J. McCarthy is from the Department of Biological Oceanography at Harvard University.

Read more at Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Read more at the SEBS Newsroom.

 

REI Student Travel Awards

The Rutgers Energy Institute (REI) Travel Award, offered annually, has been developed with the goal of enhancing the scholarship and success of our students and to provide richer and broader exposure to the topics and challenges in energy. Travel awards, open to both undergraduate and graduate students, are given in recognition of good scholarship for those seeking to enter the clean energy /environmental field. Students in any discipline related to energy are eligible including physical sciences, engineering, economics, social sciences, and policy.

Quick facts:

  • To offset the cost of travel and meeting attendance, travel awards are awarded to eligible students in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS), School of Arts & Sciences (SAS), School of Engineering (SOE), Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy (BSPPP), and Rutgers Business School (RBS).
  • Open to Undergraduate and Graduate Students.
  • Applications may be submitted once in the spring and once in the fall semester. However, a student may only receive one award in any 12-month period.
  • Eligible expenses include meeting registration, lodging, meals, and transportation.  

The funds are primarily intended for the following activities:

  1. Presentation of papers at scientific meetings.

In order to be eligible for scientific meeting funding, a formal abstract acknowledging Rutgers Energy Institute as a research funder must be submitted and accepted by the conference organizers. The research must be part of the approved dissertation proposal or capstone/research project. Graduate and undergraduate applicants are required to present a poster or paper at a meeting. Projects involving multiple faculty advisors, with expertise spanning both scientific/engineering and societal/policy aspects, will be encouraged.

  1.  Research related activities such as spending a brief period in another lab to learn a new technique or a research internship.
  1.  Career and training activities such as an internship to learn career skills.

To apply for the REI undergraduate or graduate student travel award, please send the following materials as one single pdf package to Beatrice Birrer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please use the following email subject line: REI Travel Award: [Your Name].

  1. A cover sheet listing your full name, email address, current and undergraduate institutions, academic discipline(s), faculty advisor(s), the name of the meeting/research or career related activity, start and end dates and location must be submitted.
  2. A current CV for graduate students, optional for undergraduates
  3. An essay describing your interest in the field of energy and how the proposed activities are critical to your education (500 words maximum)
  4. A letter of support from your faculty advisor
  5. An itemized budget
  6. Identification of any prior REI travel support
  7. Corresponding proof of acceptance by organization or host. Submitted abstract must be included.

Please consider making a donation to the REI Student Support Fund by clicking here to help our students improve their communication skills and develop scholarly collaborations to enhance their education. 

Application Deadlines

Students are eligible for one travel grant per academic year, based on the availability of funding.

For travel and related expenses that will occur between January 1 and June 30, applications are due by November 1.

For travel and related expenses that will occur between July 1 and December 31, applications are due by May 1.

By submitting an application, the student acknowledges that if awarded, upon completion of the supported travel, the student will submit a brief report to REI. The report is to include a description of the experience/activities, photographs, and the benefits to the student's scholarship.

 

Rutgers researchers co-author first study on biological impacts of abruptly ending efforts to cool Earth’s climate.

Volcanoes, nuclear war, and solar geo-engineering.

With a research portfolio that includes all three, Alan Robock is used to thinking about sudden, catastrophic change. A professor of environmental science at Rutgers University, Robock studies the movement of small particles and liquids through Earth’s atmosphere. In that role, he researches some very large and particle-producing events: the sudden extrusion of many tons of sulfur from an erupting volcano, or the global convection of smoke and ash from the firestorms that would follow a nuclear war. Read more of The Atlantic article...

Georgios Tsilomelekis- assistant professor, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, School of Engineering, is the principal investigator of an award totaling $292,193. The project, titled Elucidating Solvent Effects in Biomass Conversion Reactions by Means of Operando Spectroscopy, is being supported by the National Science Foundation. Learn more about Tsilomelekis here.

Richard Riman, distinguished professor, Rutgers University, of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering is one of this year's HIVE 50 Honorees in the Building Technology category. The HIVE 50 are drawn from the top people, products and processes that are leading the charge to inspire creativity, higher performance, and innovation in housing. Honorees are separated into five categories – building technology, capital, design, intel and strategy. Read more...

The latest Annual Report published by the Office of Research and Economic Development highlighting Rutgers research achievements for Fiscal Year 2017 is now available to view and download. Read more...

The newly formed Honors College at Rutgers University was envisioned as “a living-learning community focused on tackling complex problems and global challenges.” Four students and their faculty advisors just put that theory into practice. Honors College students Yuki Osumi ('20/School of Arts and Sciences), Sarah Pomeranz ('20/Rutgers Business School), and Anurag Modak ('20/SAS), with Ari Mendelow (‘18/School of Engineering) won the Hult Prize at Rutgers University Competition on December 8. Johnson & Johnson, one of the sponsors of the competition donated the $1,000 first prize.

Rutgers Business School student Sarah Pomeranz said that she and the team were ecstatic over the win, and very grateful to their advisors. “We had a Board of Advisors comprised of Rutgers faculty and professionals spanning the campus; we learned so much from them and our experiences in the Rutgers Eco Complex and the Innovation Lab .”

SULIS (solar ultraviolet light-induced sterilization) is a solar powered water purification system for communities without access to clean water, whether they are in developing countries or recovering from natural disasters. The team’s research shows that using ultraviolet light the technology could sterilize 12 liters of water in seven hours.  Read more....

Making fuel from plants has long been a goal of scientists and engineers hoping to limit wild swings in fuel prices and availability and to prepare for a time when fi nite supplies of petroleum dry up.But the promise of obtaining abundant and sus-tainable supplies of liquid fuel from biomass, by and large agricultural crops, is a challenge that still vexes scientists and engineers after decades of research.

Rutgers School of Engineering assistant professor Shishir Chundawat...Read more.

Assistant Professor - Atmospheric Chemistry

Rutgers University–New Brunswick, New Jersey

Applications will be begin to be reviewed January 31, 2018

The Department of Environmental Sciences (http://envsci.rutgers.edu) at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the area of Atmospheric Chemistry. The successful candidate should have a Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry, chemical engineering, or a related environmental discipline and demonstrated ability to conduct research in a university setting; teach at the graduate and undergraduate levels in atmospheric chemistry or other courses relevant to research interests; and mentor students. We seek applicants with research interests in areas including, but not limited to, interactions between climate change and air quality, and the role of atmospheric chemistry in biogeochemical cycles. We especially encourage applicants who desire to develop interdisciplinary projects and to collaborate with faculty from other programs and departments at Rutgers, including Earth and Planetary Sciences, Ecology and Evolution, Geography, Marine and Coastal Sciences, Biochemistry and Microbiology, the School of Engineering, and the Rutgers Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. The successful applicant will be eligible for membership in the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, which unites faculty, researchers, and graduate students studying Earth's interior, continents, oceans, atmosphere, and biosphere, their interactions through Earth history, and their effects on human civilization today. Applicants will be expected to develop a strong, externally-funded research program and to contribute to the Department's education and research missions at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The facilities of the Department of Environmental Sciences include local and remote supercomputing and an array of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation. As a member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, we have access to the computing and research facilities of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Locally, our Photochemical Assessment Monitoring (PAM) Site (http://pamsite.rutgers.edu/) supports continuous, real-time measurements of various physical and chemical properties of the lower boundary layer, including surface energy fluxes. Through the PAM Site, the department has a strong working relationship with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Air Quality, which controls over 100 air monitors at 33 different field sites throughout the state. A member of the Big Ten and the Association of American Universities, Rutgers-New Brunswick is America’s eighth oldest institution of higher learning and New Jersey’s premier public research university. The city of New Brunswick sits in the center of America’s vibrant northeast corridor, which runs from Boston to Washington, D.C. We are close to NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton and NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, NY, and our faculty members collaborate with scientists at both. We host one of the most diverse student bodies in the United States. As our 2016 commencement speaker President Barack Obama said, “America converges here.”

Qualified applicants should apply at http://jobs.rutgers.edu/postings/53675 with a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, and the names and contact information for three references. Review of applications will begin January 31, 2018, with an intended start date of September 1, 2018. Applicants from underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. Questions may be addressed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Rutgers University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Qualified applicants will be considered for employment regardless of race, creed, color, national origin, age, ancestry, nationality, marital or domestic partnership or civil union status, sex, pregnancy, gender identity or expression, disability status, liability for military service, protected veteran status, affectional or sexual orientation, genetic information, or any other category protected by law. As an institution, we value diversity of background and opinion, and prohibit discrimination or harassment on the basis of any legally protected class in the areas of hiring, recruitment, promotion, transfer, demotion, training, compensation, pay, fringe benefits, layoff, termination or any other terms and conditions of employment. For additional information please see the Non-Discrimination Statement at the following web address: http://uhr.rutgers.edu/non-discrimination-statement

This report was prepared by Rutgers University in consultation with the New Jersey Climate Change and Public Health Working Group of the New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance. A draft version of this report was issued in February 2017.  The Alliance received public comments on the draft report and made revisions to address the comments in this final version.

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